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Friday, February 25, 2011

RV Celtic Explorer Newfoundland & Labrador Fishery Survey: DAY 26

Date 24/02/2011 Time: 21:30 hrs (UTC)

Position:    51 35.98 N   51 57.29  W

Wind  18  Knots


After a long sleepless night of high winds that gusted over 50 knots NE (the worst) and another bout of raging stormy seas over Belle Isle Bank everyone on board was feeling a little worn out and broken today. It was decided that any ventures further North were futile with another storm, this time SW with winds up to 60 knots, forecast in about 48 h time. So we turned south, and with the wind and swells on our stern after lunch it became much calmer. We caught a rare glimpse of sky and then even the sun came out to play, moods lifted, the sampling continued and now we have a pleasant evening ahead of us in much calmer seas.

Looking out over the stern of the Celtic Explorer as the sun sets…


PhD student Craig Knickle, deep in thought?  Or possibly sleepy… !

We managed to carry on with the acoustic surveying and with the accompanying sampling in the wet lab. Shrimp was the order of the day, as we crossed Belle Isle Bank towards the Notre Dame Channel.

Our Chief Scientist Dr George Rose keeping a close watch on the echosounder screens.

We have had an amazing sunset today, hence the photos, however I have been told in no uncertain terms to  point out that this was a rare calm between the crazy and turbulent seas that have accompanied most of this trip. Although these photos could pass for a romantic night at sea in the Caribbean, we are still in the Western North Atlantic, in February…!

Watercolour painted sky…

So to end today, here is a picture of seas more typical of what we have experienced during the past few days!

Angry seas off the beam of the Celtic Explorer.

Many waves broke over her bow last night, sending shudders through the vessel, typically followed by steep rolls that made sleep difficult for everyone!

We will have a respite for maybe 24 h before the next bout of 60 knot winds.

Until tomorrow …


Blog and pictures by Kate Barley.

 

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