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Friday, February 18, 2011

RV Celtic Explorer Newfoundland & Labrador Fishery Survey: DAY 20

Date 18/02/2011 Time: 23:30 hrs (UTC)

Position: 51 21.76 N; 055 34.42 W; St. Anthony, northern Newfoundland, docked


Day 20 was spent enjoying St. Anthony and getting ready for the main push of survey which will begin tomorrow. Graduate students Livia Goodbrand and Laura Wheeland went for a hike in the nearby hills, and seem to have conquered at least one.

Graduate Students Livia Goodbrand and Laura Wheeland conquering a hill near St. Anthony (photo by Laura Wheeland – how did she take it she is in the picture?)

Back inside the Celtic Explorer, quite refreshed, Laura decided to show everyone what she had learned at McMaster University during her BSc degree.

Graduate Student Laura Wheeland showing what she learned at McMaster,
and amazing dexterity in a moving boat (photo by Kate Barley)

Down in the bowels of the ship, the day shift went to work cleaning up the wet lab in preparation for the major push on the cod survey.

Graduate students Craig Knickle (foreground) and Kyle Krumsick (in background)
and sea tech Ed Stern scrubbing …
(photo by Kate Barley)

Surveys take a lot of planning. We took advantage of the down time to rethink how best to use the final 10 days of the survey to maximize coverage.

Graduate student Riley Pollom, sea tech Gordon Adams, Chief Scientist Dr. George Rose
and Fisheries Biologist Wade Hiscock discuss the coming survey
(photo by Kate Barley)

For dinner tonight, we had a fine meal of Irish haddock – almost as good as ‘northern cod’ and cooked to perfection. More about the hard working kitchen staff in a later blog – how important they are to life on the Celtic Explorer.

Outside the Bight, the winds are dropping quickly. By tomorrow they are expected to be down to reasonable levels (less than 30 knots) and the forecast is for fine weather (‘large days’ in the Newfoundland jargon) for the next week. The high seas, however, will be slower to come down, as the built up momentum in the ocean swells will not give way so easily. Our strategy will be to go with the southward swells initially, then turn north as they subside. We leave at daybreak…



Blog by Kate Barley and Dr. George Rose.




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